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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Quoss’

PurpleGreenRectanbleFinal
In this painting, the rectangular shapes were added last. They add a counterpoint to the curved forms, create planes in perspective and play on the idea of frames within frames. The most startling discovery for us in class, however, was the fact that the purple square PurpleGreenRectanbleFinalLettersbecame green as it crossed the purple field. (This is barely perceptible in the small image here.)
The color of the line did not change, but our perception changed. The line (L) became green (G) because the purple of the line was cooler, i.e. more blue, than the warm, reddish purple of the field(F).
We don’t see a patch of color absolutely. We see it in relation to what’s next to it.
The authority on how we see color is Josef Albers (1888-1976), who was born in Germany, taught at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Dessau and Berlin, emigrated to the US and taught at the Black Mountain School in North Carolina.

JosefAlbers1

For an excellent overview of his work and dazzling examples of how color fools us, see http://www.brainpickings.org/2013/08/16/interaction-of-color-josef-albers-50th-anniversary/

JosefAlbers2
Painting by Michael Quoss, oil on canvas, 30”x40”.
Josef Albers, two examples from his book, “Interaction of Color.” 1963
All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.
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PicassoHead
It’s not really a triptych, it’s one painting. But there are prominent vertical lines that suggest a division into three parts.
Altar pieces in the Middle Ages often took the form of a triptych, where the center panel was larger and depicted the main theological message. In this painting, however, the center “panel” is rather vacant. It has the least detail. It leaves you peaceful and open to possibilities. Your eye is drawn to the edges, where the action is and this keeps you jumpin’, as they say in jazz.
picassoShadowAt the top left there’s a circular form, a sort of blue balloon atop a narrow black “stem.” Of course, we associate this to a human head. The artist’s intention was to balance the  disk in the lower right corner. But in the upper part of a painting such a round shape (especially on a “stem”) will trigger the human association. Once we have that, we can even find legs in the painting.
This reminded me of the games Picasso plays.
Painting by Michael Quoss, oil on canvas, 30”x40”.
Pablo Picasso, “The Shadow,” 1953.
All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.
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http://katherinehilden.wordpress.com
http://www.katherinehilden.com
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