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Lava Paint

17janblacklava

Art supply stores carry many special-effects paints. The one used here is Lava Paint.  When applied thick, as here, where it was actually squeezed directly out of the tube onto the canvas, it dries black.  When dragged with a brush, the lava dust will appear as individual black dots because the suspension dries clear.

Jack Sherborne, 30” x 40”

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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Diptych, Possibly

17marchdiptychr

The previous painting may have found a partner in diptych-land here.

17marchdiptych

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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Painting with Gauze

17marchdiptychl

This acrylic painting is on 300 lb water color paper, which is heavier than chipboard and has uneven edges, because it’s handmade. Using acrylic paint the artist attached gauze and later a white coarse weave that got semi-cancelled by an insistent black brush stroke. The composition consists of rectilinear shapes boldly applied with a large brush.  The gauze, which becomes visible only close up, adds not only a surprising texture but also an unexpected contrapuntal  delicacy to this otherwise sturdy composition.

Jan Fleckman, acrylic on paper, ~30” x 24”

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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Explosion, Implosion

17march

Your first impression may be that something’s exploding here.  But notice that in an explosion there would be a center and you can’t find one of those here.  Once you’re used to the chaos, you follow the blue lines and, oops, where do they lead you?  Back in! There you may not find an epicenter, but you do find chaos, a popping chaos. Now you’re out again only to be led in again by the blue lines.  At some point during this back and forth, you notice the white disc.  So discreet, against a light background, off center and not at all commanding.  But once you see it, you realize that there was a subtle mind at play here.

I only wish it were huge, 8 feet high, big enough to fill a wall.

Bruce Boyer, oil on canvas, 30” x 40”

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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Invitation to Boredom

17feb

Just try!  Look at this and try being bored.  Try harder.

Bruce Boyer, oil on canvas, 30” x 40”

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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17feb1redyelbl

Blue is theoretically a color that recedes.  Red, of course, comes forward and announces itself as the boss.

In this painting, how does that little sliver of blue on the left manage to hold its own against that huge red in this painting? One, it’s striped and stripes are aggressive. (Look at sports and military uniform: stripes rule.)  Two, it’s at the edge of the painting and edges convey tension. (Tension demands attention because, well, because tension is uncomfortable.)

Painting in acrylic by Susan Bennett, 36” x 36”.

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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Scribble for Life

I16novleanphoto encourage my students to draw the whole figure rather than one anatomical part at a time.  Drawing the whole figure right from the start means scribbling and making quick adjustments when you notice that what you’ve put down on paper doesn’t hang together. Scribbling is messy.  Now, remember when you were in third grade and your teacher encouraged you to be messy?  No, you don’t, of course not.  This veneration of neatness that’s taught so early is hard to overcome.  But you can’t make art worshiping in that shrine.

16novleanclassdemo

The pose in the photo is so dramatic that if you approach it one bit at a time, you’ll inevitably make it stiff. When I introduced this photo in class I first did a demo drawing with everybody standing around me.  It took a couple of minutes and it’s a mess.  But you must admit, it isn’t stiff or boring.  It doesn’t pretend to be finished.  But I hope it conveys the excitement of the artist getting into the process.

Jeanne Mueller worked with the Aquarellable Pencil on gloss paper.

16novleanfinal

This means she was able to change lines and shadings by just swiping the paper with a damp paper towel.  Notice what major changes were made before she arrived at the finished drawing.  Notice also, how the invented background of stripes transforms the drawing from an illustration of a figure into a complete composition.

At right is the earlier, more literal  version of her drawing.20161110_145040

Jeanne Mueller, Aquarellable on gloss paper, 17” x 11”

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2016/10/08/how-it-sits-on-the-page/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2016/10/02/drawing-sculpture/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2016/09/30/ptolemy-in-ulm/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2016/08/18/take-the-a-frame/

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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http://katherinehilden.wordpress.com

www.katherinehilden.com

www.khilden.com