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Archive for the ‘Cropping’ Category

16septlargedrapepot

Draw a portion of the still life so that your drawing will have a definite shape on the page.  That was the assignment.  I brought in large 20160922_144208textured paper, 30” x 22”, and encouraged everyone to work in charcoal or very soft graphite.

Notice that the pot in reality is big.  Does it have to be drawn big? No.  The pot and the drapery should be drawn in such a way that they sit nicely on the page.  The artist adjusted the size of the pot so that it becomes part of the arc of the composition.

The arc could have been drawn as if floating in space, but the artist suggests some terra firma by putting in a line to indicate a table top.  Notice that the table top line is broken cezanne-sl-applesbehind the pot.  Cézanne plays this game in his paintings all the time. We’re not committed to documenting reality. The goal is to create a lively page.

Drawing by Jeanne Mueller, charcoal on paper, 30” x 22”

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loopholes

Picture this big, about 48” high.

If this painting were small, say about 12” high, the circles would look like bubbles and you might describe the painting as “cute” and “playful.”  A painting that’s bigger than you is never “cute.”

This painting by Cassandra Buccellato has a playful feeling, granted, but isn’t its play on a conceptual level?

The drips in the underpainting evoke chaos. Chaos is not a little mess, but a big solar system deal.  The circular windows impose order, not a rigid predictable order but some order, a wistful order as in “the best we can.”  The portholes we catch in this frame appear to be of an endless stream, drifting by.  I’m reminded of telescopes and the cans-o-worms they reveal: questions all the way down.

Mixed metaphors?  Well, yes, I’d rather contemplate this visually.

Painting by Cassandra Buccellato, oil on canvas, ~48” x 60”

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/3288/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2015/03/27/finding-order-in-chaos/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2015/03/26/order-interrupted/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/beyond-realism/

https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2011/06/22/naming-the-abstract/https://artamaze.wordpress.com/2011/03/12/willow-painting/

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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16draperycolumn

It’s quite startling to see this drawing in the studio/class room where it was produced because at the same time you can also see the pile of cloth and pottery that it was produced from. Before he starts to draw the artist, Linné Dosé, selects a portion of the still life.  What that means is that he sees a coherent unit and deletes everything else from his vision.  This is a skill he has developed by himself and to great effect.

The effect is that an object appears on the drawing paper, very convincing and solid but without any spatial reference. The object elicits a double take.

We read the drapery as cloth (soft) and at the same time as a column (solid).  The pot appears to be heavy and three dimensional and at the same time we can see it’s an incomplete drawing. It’s a play on perception.

Drawing by Linné Dosé, graphite, ~18” x 14”

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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15JanPots

This is how the drawing sat on the page.

You can see that the artist/student, Linné Dosé, has developed a love of composition and form.   The drawing suggests a still life, you know, the usual pottery. But notice, we don’t get details here, no loyalty to the objects, no shadow and reflected-light games.

A work of art tells you how it wants to be looked at. This drawing directs your mind away from literalness.  It says, forget the pots.

Shape, Form, Space!

As it sits on the drawing paper it extends horizontally and that suggests a setting, a certain degree of literalness.

Now look what happens when we crop it to a square.

15JanPotsCropRad

The forms are so much more pure forms.

The square format will do that.  Uncanny.  It speaks to our modern sensibility.

Why would that be?

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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16FebArches
These cropped forms suggest some architectural element, with variations. Or, maybe, chair backs. In any case, something well designed, serious and possibly monumental. At the same time, unstable and meaningless. If they are structures, you can see that they lack bracing but are, nevertheless, solid. They’re grand in some way. And there are many of them, this we can infer from the cropping.
This, therefore, is a painting that at first glance suggests clarity of statement. But if you fall for its seduction, you’ll soon chase yourself in circular thinking and you end up not “getting” it at all. This is a good thing. You’re looking at art.
Painting by Harold Bauer. Oil on canvas, ~30” x 24”
16FebArchesFlipNow let’s flip it horizontally. Oh, look! The flipped version seems much friendlier, more accessible. It lacks the gravitas of the original. I would not ponder this version, I would consider it “lite,” a bit decorative, merely clever.
All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.
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16Jan
This drawing is a dramatic departure from the literal. The artist happily gives up illustration and instead moves into a play on form. Such a venture calls for omissions: you don’t have to draw everything that’s in that pile of stuff, you pick and choose as you go with the call of the composition emerging on your page. Notice how this page teases you out of your prosaic, fact-loving mind and leads you into the pleasure of pure form.
16JanNumbersIf there had been more stripes, they would have nailed you down in the simple association to hey-that’s- a-tablecloth. Instead, the artist skips the literalness of the tablecloth and picks just three stripes (1) which lead you to the little pot (2) that plays second fiddle to the grand pitcher (4). The pitcher, however is also underplayed, it’s incomplete, but you know everything you need to know about it: look at that superb curved handle. Then, to balance the composition on the right we have nothing but a line. But what a line. So elegant, it hold its own against all that drama at (1) and (2).
16Jan Crop2The class debated whether the drawing should be cropped and considered this version. The question was left open.
Drawing by Linné Dosé. Graphite, 14”x16”
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14StillLifeByWindow
What better way to spend a cold, rainy Sunday afternoon than setting up a still life for yourself. Sit down. Draw.
Your set up can be elaborate and you can select passages for multiple drawings.

14StillLifeByWindowCube

Because it’s in your home, you can return to it over several days…maybe weeks. Drapery, as we all know, can take time. Draw big.

14StillLifeByWindowPears

Treat yourself to many hours of drawing!

14StillLifeByWindowTomato
You can, of course, also draw from the images on your screen, like these.

14StillLifeByWindowPots
All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.
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