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Search Results for 'reflected light'

Yes, why is that? (Continued from previous post.) The drawing of the cylinder in the class demo was about 2” high. Everybody stood around and watched how I did it and listened to the straight-forward explanation of how this works. It took 2-3 minutes. So quick, so easy. Students love the effect created by the […]

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By the middle of the 16th century the Protestant reformers were raging against Catholic dogma and inspiring their followers to ransack old churches, destroying stained glass windows, murals, paintings, statues, tapestries and candelabras. The Catholic hierarchy fought back and stood its ground. The battle of the Counter Reformation was so serious that the pope convened […]

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If you want to create the illusion of roundness in either painting or drawing, you need to study how light plays on a round object.  Here’s the textbook analysis of a sphere being hit by light from the upper left and casting a shadow on the lover right. You can memorize this image and its […]

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When Fredéric Bazille (1841-1870) paints his sleeve, he  wants to create the illusion of roundness and therefore he has to show a sliver of reflected light.             ——————————————————————————————– In the engraving of The Death of Mary, Martin Schongauer (1450-1491) stops his burin (engraving tool) before he gets to the edge […]

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In whatever drawing you’re working on, try darkening the outline (=contour) of the shapes arbitrarily. If it’s a figure, darken the outline of the forearm. See how that affects your perception of depth. Or press your pencil down harder when you’re outlining one side of the face. Immerse yourself in how this feels. In the […]

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Drapery? Where? You mean those whitish-bluish triangles and trapezoids? Picasso was twenty-six when he painted this. By the time he was fourteen, he had mastered the skill to create the illusion of drapery or any other illusion he might have felt like creating. There was big money in illusions in the 1890’s. But not for […]

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When you’re drawing the stuff of still life, there will be no hurt feelings. No box, bottle or drapery rag will accuse you of being shallow or insensitive or getting the proportions wrong. Not only is this, then, an invitation to scribble away with abandon and produce new, improved markmaking, but it’s also an opportunity […]

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Of all the possible ways of displaying still life objects, my favorite is to create a proscenium stage with a small shipping box. I take off all the labels, paint the inside white and assemble a cast of small white bottles, hand-cream jars and other round objects. The whiteness keeps the artist/student focused on shape […]

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Go to the grocery store.  Come home, unload the paper bag on the kitchen counter and put your stuff into the fridge and pantry. There’s the bag.  Crumple it up some more.  Find it irresistible. Contemplate. Sit down with your drawing board, paper and pencil (charcoal or whatever you like) and draw it.  Lose track […]

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Scatter the peels of five oranges on a board. Draw. Not so fast. The exercise was set up with the instruction to draw each wedge convincingly with shadows and reflected light and at the same time to connect all the wedges so that they would read as a unit.  Notice, also, that there’s a gap […]

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